How Does a Dentist Diagnose Head Pain, including Migraines?

How Does a Dentist Diagnose Head Pain, including Migraines?

Almost every one of us has experienced a headache, or other head pain in our lives. Many of us have also experienced a severe and possibly debilitating migraine. Head pain can be extremely uncomfortable and burdensome, so it becomes important to learn about the cause and remedy this as quickly as possible. Your dentist may actual be pivotal in diagnosing head pain and finding those migraine triggers. Here are some possible oral causes for head pain that your dentist and head pain specialist could help to determine.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)

The temporomandibular joint as the joint that connects your jaw to the rest of your skull. This is a fairly complex joint, as it allows for not only strong biting, but movement in several directions. Overuse or damage to this joint can cause pain to travel up your head, causing head pain or even migraines.

Toothaches

Another common cause of head pain is deferred pain from a toothache. Toothaches may be caused by a number of reasons, but most commonly result from cavities, root issues, or gum disease. The stimulation of the nerve near your tooth can cause pain to travel, presenting as head pain or migraines. Your dentist will be able to examine your teeth and gums as part of your regular checkup and determine if any decay or other problems could be causing your head pain.

Bruxism

Bruxism is the fancy way of referring to the grinding or clenching of teeth. Many people are not even aware that they may grind or clench their sleep, whether during the day or even while asleep. There are many causes for bruxism, including stress, alcohol and caffeine consumption, or misaligned teeth. Head pain and even migraines are common symptoms of bruxism, and your dentist will be able to examine your teeth for signs of wear, and indications that you are grinding or clenching.

The human body is a complex and connected system. When one part experiences problems, it can have wide reaching effects. Dentists are able to diagnose possible causes for your head pain, and help you get back to feeling yourself.

What is Whiplash Induced TMJ?

What is Whiplash Induced TMJ?

For those experiencing whiplash trauma, there is a high chance that whiplash will induce TMJ symptoms. Many people are not aware of what whiplash induced TMJ, and the need for a neck pain specialist to help with managing symptoms.

What is TMJ Pain?

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the joint in which the jaw connects to the rest of the skull. This is a complicated joint, especially when considering the number of different movements it is capable of moving, and the fine muscles it needs to accomplish this. When these muscles, or the surrounding ligaments, discs or bones are damaged, such as in the event of whiplash, the result can be a painful TMJ syndrome.

TMJ syndrome can carry many painful symptoms with it, including head and neck pain, ear pain, headaches and migraines, and even difficulty chewing, and speaking. When people experience whiplash, they may not realize that head or neck pain is the result of TMJ damage, and this is where whiplash treatment by a neck pain specialist is needed.

Neck Pain Specialist

A neck pain specialist, such as those at BC Headpain, is able to properly assess your pain and determine if it is caused by whiplash induced TMJ. With a proper diagnosis, a thorough treatment plan can be recommended, and steps towards healing and ridding yourself of chronic pain can be realized.

If you have suffered from whiplash, and continue to have symptoms in line with TMJ syndrome, make sure to contact BC Headpain today.

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Answer: There is likely to be some degree of discomfort caused by a tooth distraction.

Often a tooth extraction is a necessary treatment, whether its to relieve a crowded mouth, or remove wisdom teeth. While the extraction of teeth has not been shown to directly cause head pain, there are some related factors that may result in head pain, such as:

  • Surgery Recovery
  • Jaw Pain
  • Stress

Surgery Recovery

As with any surgery, even minor ones such as tooth extraction, there will be some degree of damage and discomfort. This pain could be caused by soft tissue damage within your mouth, as a result of being cut during tooth extraction. This pain is often localized pain, but may become a headache or migraine.

Jaw Pain

With any dental treatment, especially tooth extraction, the jaw is forced to open wide and held there for an extended period of time. This creates stress on the muscles, or even muscle tearing. Jaw Pain is a primary candidate for causing migraines and other head pain, and tooth extraction could lead to this.

Stress and Anxiety

Finally, the stress of having a tooth extracted may cause anxiety which leads to grinding and clenching of teeth. Other pain from after the procedure could further exacerbate this, leading to further head pain.

Head Pain Treatment

If you are suffering from head pain after a tooth extraction, you should seek out head pain treatment from a head pain specialist in Surrey. If the pain is located where the tooth used to reside, there may be other issues such as infection and it is important to get checked out. If you have other head pain, there may be treatments and remedies available to help you with this, and get you back on your feet.

Anatomical Links Between Headaches and Dental Pain

Anatomical Links Between Headaches and Dental Pain

If you are suffering from chronic or constant headaches, you may not realize that it could actually be tied to your oral health. Dental health and dental pain may actually be the reason for that headache. Headaches and dental pain have a lot in common, and finding that headache relief or head pain cure may require dealing with an oral health issue.

Pain as a result of a headache and/or toothache are both transmitted through the same nerve, the Trigeminal nerve. This nerve is the largest peripheral nerve in your head, and innervates the face, jaw, teeth and other oral structures.

Nerves, especially the Trigeminal nerve, can be long with many branches, or dendrites. This means that stimuli at one point can be carried and stimulate the nerve at other points. This cascading effect is likely to trigger a headache. This means that when a tooth is aching, as a result of a cavity or other oral health issue, this pain is transmitted down the nerve, and a headache may result.

This close anatomical link through this nerve is one probable connection between headaches and tooth pain. Other factors that may lead to migraines and head pain, based on anatomical positioning and closeness, are jaw clenching, and neck tension. These, along with the previous factors, make it difficult to decipher the exact cause of your migraine.

Thankfully, a dentist will be able to examine your mouth and teeth and help to determine if any dental pain may be resulting in head pain. Headache relief may be just a visit to the dentist away, so if you are suffering from migraines or chronic head pain, make sure you get your oral health examined.

How Does Clenching Teeth Cause Headaches?

How Does Clenching Teeth Cause Headaches?

Answer: Your headache could be caused by your jaw and teeth clenching. Here’s why:

When you think of a headache, you probably think about pain on the top or the side of your head. What we do not think of is that our jaws may be to blame. Clenched teeth are a common cause of many headaches or migraines. These are often referred to as dental headaches.

How does clenching teeth cause headaches?

The joint that connects your jaw to your skull is called the temporomandibular joint, or the TMJ for short. As with any joint, the TMJ has muscles connecting to both sides of it, allowing it to open and close, giving you the ability to talk and chew. It is these very muscles that could be the cause of your headaches.

When you grind or clench your teeth, the muscles involved are tightened. This tightening can result in pain which is transmitted or deferred to other places in your head, ultimately causing a headache like sensation. If this is severe or chronic, it can also be referred to a migraine.

How to avoid a clenched teeth headache

To ease or even avoid a dental headache, you will want to make sure that you keep your TMJ muscles from becoming tight and sore. This can be achieved through chiropractic treatment, basic stretching, and massage. You should also consult with your dentist to make sure that improperly aligned teeth or other dental diseases are not contributing to your pain.

If you have been suffering from headaches, or even migraines, make sure that you consider that it could be a dental headache. If you are unsure, make sure you seek out professional help, and find the relief that you deserve.