What Type Of Headache Do You Have

Headaches are just that, your head aches. When you are suffering from a headache and seeking medical advice, a common question you will hear is “what type of headache do you have”? Knowing the different types of headaches and their causes, can help find the most effective treatment.

Some common headaches include:

Tension Headache

A tension headache begins slowly and can be felt across the forehead just above the eyes. This type of headache may feel as though a tight band is around your head. Radiating pain down the back of the neck and into the shoulders. A pain level of mild to moderate. Tension headaches can last for a few hours; depending on your stress level, a tension headache can last for several days. Unfortunately, due to work, health and other contributing factors, tension headaches can become a chronic ailment, requiring intervention from your doctor.

Cluster Headache

Cluster headaches behave just as their name describes, in clusters. Several headaches or groups of headaches can come on in waves lasting 20 minutes or longer. Typically, a cluster headache is very severe on the pain scale and for the average suffer come on suddenly in the middle of the night. Other side effects of a cluster headache include nasal stuffiness, drooping eyelid and tearing of the eyes. Although rare, cluster headaches can afflict a sufferer for weeks and or months at a time. Non-life threatening, cluster headaches can be treated by your doctor, making them shorter and or less severe.

Sinus Headache

Sinus headaches are very common for those that live in damper climates like Vancouver. A sinus headache can be an early sign of a sinus infection. A sinus headache will present with a lot of pressure in the areas of your eyes, forehead and nose. Putting your head forward can cause that pressure and pain increase. A sinus headache is usually accompanied by congestion, a runny nose, fatigue and an achy feeling in your upper teeth or gums.

Migraine Headache

A migraine can be debilitating, with severe throbbing pain typically on one side of the head. Migraine sufferers have reported their headaches lasting from hours to days, usually requiring them to be in complete silence and darkness. For some, a migraine can present early warning signals called “auras” including flashes of light, a tingling sensation in their face, or blind spots. Recurring migraines should be treated by your doctor to confirm there is not an underlying medical concern causing the migraine.

Headaches are disruptive, whether it be a tension, sinus, cluster or migraine headache. Knowing the symptoms of the different types of headaches will better assist you and your doctor in determining what is the best treatment to eliminate the pain and other symptoms that can come with a headache. Treatment centres like the BC Head Pain Institute in Vancouver can work with you to determine the type, cause and treatment of your head pain.

How Does a Dentist Diagnose Head Pain, including Migraines?

How Does a Dentist Diagnose Head Pain, including Migraines?

Almost every one of us has experienced a headache, or other head pain in our lives. Many of us have also experienced a severe and possibly debilitating migraine. Head pain can be extremely uncomfortable and burdensome, so it becomes important to learn about the cause and remedy this as quickly as possible. Your dentist may actual be pivotal in diagnosing head pain and finding those migraine triggers. Here are some possible oral causes for head pain that your dentist and head pain specialist could help to determine.

Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMJ)

The temporomandibular joint as the joint that connects your jaw to the rest of your skull. This is a fairly complex joint, as it allows for not only strong biting, but movement in several directions. Overuse or damage to this joint can cause pain to travel up your head, causing head pain or even migraines.

Toothaches

Another common cause of head pain is deferred pain from a toothache. Toothaches may be caused by a number of reasons, but most commonly result from cavities, root issues, or gum disease. The stimulation of the nerve near your tooth can cause pain to travel, presenting as head pain or migraines. Your dentist will be able to examine your teeth and gums as part of your regular checkup and determine if any decay or other problems could be causing your head pain.

Bruxism

Bruxism is the fancy way of referring to the grinding or clenching of teeth. Many people are not even aware that they may grind or clench their sleep, whether during the day or even while asleep. There are many causes for bruxism, including stress, alcohol and caffeine consumption, or misaligned teeth. Head pain and even migraines are common symptoms of bruxism, and your dentist will be able to examine your teeth for signs of wear, and indications that you are grinding or clenching.

The human body is a complex and connected system. When one part experiences problems, it can have wide reaching effects. Dentists are able to diagnose possible causes for your head pain, and help you get back to feeling yourself.

What is Whiplash Induced TMJ?

What is Whiplash Induced TMJ?

For those experiencing whiplash trauma, there is a high chance that whiplash will induce TMJ symptoms. Many people are not aware of what whiplash induced TMJ, and the need for a neck pain specialist to help with managing symptoms.

What is TMJ Pain?

The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the joint in which the jaw connects to the rest of the skull. This is a complicated joint, especially when considering the number of different movements it is capable of moving, and the fine muscles it needs to accomplish this. When these muscles, or the surrounding ligaments, discs or bones are damaged, such as in the event of whiplash, the result can be a painful TMJ syndrome.

TMJ syndrome can carry many painful symptoms with it, including head and neck pain, ear pain, headaches and migraines, and even difficulty chewing, and speaking. When people experience whiplash, they may not realize that head or neck pain is the result of TMJ damage, and this is where whiplash treatment by a neck pain specialist is needed.

Neck Pain Specialist

A neck pain specialist, such as those at BC Headpain, is able to properly assess your pain and determine if it is caused by whiplash induced TMJ. With a proper diagnosis, a thorough treatment plan can be recommended, and steps towards healing and ridding yourself of chronic pain can be realized.

If you have suffered from whiplash, and continue to have symptoms in line with TMJ syndrome, make sure to contact BC Headpain today.

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Can Tooth Extraction Cause Pain?

Answer: There is likely to be some degree of discomfort caused by a tooth distraction.

Often a tooth extraction is a necessary treatment, whether its to relieve a crowded mouth, or remove wisdom teeth. While the extraction of teeth has not been shown to directly cause head pain, there are some related factors that may result in head pain, such as:

  • Surgery Recovery
  • Jaw Pain
  • Stress

Surgery Recovery

As with any surgery, even minor ones such as tooth extraction, there will be some degree of damage and discomfort. This pain could be caused by soft tissue damage within your mouth, as a result of being cut during tooth extraction. This pain is often localized pain, but may become a headache or migraine.

Jaw Pain

With any dental treatment, especially tooth extraction, the jaw is forced to open wide and held there for an extended period of time. This creates stress on the muscles, or even muscle tearing. Jaw Pain is a primary candidate for causing migraines and other head pain, and tooth extraction could lead to this.

Stress and Anxiety

Finally, the stress of having a tooth extracted may cause anxiety which leads to grinding and clenching of teeth. Other pain from after the procedure could further exacerbate this, leading to further head pain.

Head Pain Treatment

If you are suffering from head pain after a tooth extraction, you should seek out head pain treatment from a head pain specialist in Surrey. If the pain is located where the tooth used to reside, there may be other issues such as infection and it is important to get checked out. If you have other head pain, there may be treatments and remedies available to help you with this, and get you back on your feet.

Anatomical Links Between Headaches and Dental Pain

Anatomical Links Between Headaches and Dental Pain

If you are suffering from chronic or constant headaches, you may not realize that it could actually be tied to your oral health. Dental health and dental pain may actually be the reason for that headache. Headaches and dental pain have a lot in common, and finding that headache relief or head pain cure may require dealing with an oral health issue.

Pain as a result of a headache and/or toothache are both transmitted through the same nerve, the Trigeminal nerve. This nerve is the largest peripheral nerve in your head, and innervates the face, jaw, teeth and other oral structures.

Nerves, especially the Trigeminal nerve, can be long with many branches, or dendrites. This means that stimuli at one point can be carried and stimulate the nerve at other points. This cascading effect is likely to trigger a headache. This means that when a tooth is aching, as a result of a cavity or other oral health issue, this pain is transmitted down the nerve, and a headache may result.

This close anatomical link through this nerve is one probable connection between headaches and tooth pain. Other factors that may lead to migraines and head pain, based on anatomical positioning and closeness, are jaw clenching, and neck tension. These, along with the previous factors, make it difficult to decipher the exact cause of your migraine.

Thankfully, a dentist will be able to examine your mouth and teeth and help to determine if any dental pain may be resulting in head pain. Headache relief may be just a visit to the dentist away, so if you are suffering from migraines or chronic head pain, make sure you get your oral health examined.

How Does Clenching Teeth Cause Headaches?

How Does Clenching Teeth Cause Headaches?

Answer: Your headache could be caused by your jaw and teeth clenching. Here’s why:

When you think of a headache, you probably think about pain on the top or the side of your head. What we do not think of is that our jaws may be to blame. Clenched teeth are a common cause of many headaches or migraines. These are often referred to as dental headaches.

How does clenching teeth cause headaches?

The joint that connects your jaw to your skull is called the temporomandibular joint, or the TMJ for short. As with any joint, the TMJ has muscles connecting to both sides of it, allowing it to open and close, giving you the ability to talk and chew. It is these very muscles that could be the cause of your headaches.

When you grind or clench your teeth, the muscles involved are tightened. This tightening can result in pain which is transmitted or deferred to other places in your head, ultimately causing a headache like sensation. If this is severe or chronic, it can also be referred to a migraine.

How to avoid a clenched teeth headache

To ease or even avoid a dental headache, you will want to make sure that you keep your TMJ muscles from becoming tight and sore. This can be achieved through chiropractic treatment, basic stretching, and massage. You should also consult with your dentist to make sure that improperly aligned teeth or other dental diseases are not contributing to your pain.

If you have been suffering from headaches, or even migraines, make sure that you consider that it could be a dental headache. If you are unsure, make sure you seek out professional help, and find the relief that you deserve.

Why Do People Clench Their Teeth at Night?

Why Do People Clench Their Teeth at Night?

It is not uncommon for people to clench their jaw or grind their teeth at night. When this becomes a constant, chronic problem, then it is generally referred to as Bruxism. Those who suffer from bruxism tend to clench their teeth at night when they sleep, leading to jaw pain and other possible issues.

What causes clenching?

There are several proposed reasons as to why someone might clench their teeth at night, although medical experts do not completely understand the exact causes. These reasons include:

  • Stress – People who are suffering from anxiety and chronic stress are more likely to clench their jaws as they sleep.

  • Medications, Alcohol or other drugs – A side effect of some medication may be jaw clenching. Studies have shown that people who consume alcohol, smoke tobacco, consume caffeinated beverages or use recreational drugs are also more likely to clench their teeth at night.

  • Genetic History – As with many things, teeth clenching can be passed on through genetics. If you have a family history of bruxism, you are more likely to suffer from it as well.

  • Sleep Apnea – People who suffer from sleep apnea are also more likely clench their teeth at night.

Unfortunately, an exact cause for bruxism is hard to narrow down. Often minor clenching can lead to a jaw pain or a mild headache, but severe, chronic clenching can cause damage to teeth, migraines,  and severe jaw pain.

If you are experiencing jaw pain or other symptoms, you may be clenching your teeth as you sleep. Talk to a TMJ specialist in Vancouver to assess what might be causing you to clench your teeth, and find a way to prevent it before complications arise.

Can TMJ be Dangerous?

Can TMJ be Dangerous?

Can TMJ be dangerous?

Temporomandibular joint disorder, or TMJ, is a condition that can carry many nasty symptoms, including migraines and jaw pain. When left untreated by a TMJ specialist in Vancouver, these symptoms can become chronic and much more severe, leading to longer recovery times and debilitation.

What Causes TMJ?

TMJ can be caused by a number of different disorders, including a misaligned jaw, bruxism, osteoarthritis, jaw injury due to trauma or a number of other factors. With so many contributing factors, it can be difficult to pinpoint an exact cause without the help of a TMJ specialist. Also, each of these causes carry other risks and concerns, and should be managed and treated.

TMJ Can Lead to Dangerous Conditions

TMJ is not considered to be directly life threatening or dangerous, but it does carry a danger to our quality and enjoyment of life. The symptoms, if left untreated, can cause intense migraines and severe jaw pain. While these conditions are not life threatening themselves, the pain and discomfort from migraines, jaw pain, and other neck and shoulder pain can result in lack of sleep, and impair mood. These all act as risk factors for depression, a serious and life threatening condition.

If you find yourself struggling with unexplained jaw pain or headaches, it may be worth seeking out TMJ treatment in Vancouver. Often, the sooner the condition is diagnosed and treatment begun, the less severe symptoms become and quicker recovery can be.

Computer Use and Jaw-Related Head Pain

Computer Use and Jaw-Related Head Pain

Computers have become an essential part of modern life, giving access to emails, playing games, and completing work tasks. While there are many upsides to these machines, there is evidence that shows daily computer use can cause chronic head pain.

Relationship between Computer Use and Jaw-related Head Pain

If you experience regular headaches or migraines, and use computers often, these may be related. Computer use can lead to jaw-related head pain. Some headaches and migraines are generated from the jaw muscles. When these muscles tighten or are overused, the pain can travel to other areas, often resulting in headaches or even migraines.

The main culprit of jaw-related head pain from computer use is posture. When we sit at computers, we tend to slouch, lean forward, or favour one side over the other. When this posture is continued for a prolonged period of time, it can actually cause the tendons and muscles of the jaw joints to become stressed and lead to headaches.

How can this be prevented?

The best prevention is to use computers less. Unfortunately, for many of us this is not an option, as they are vital for work activities.

If you must continue to use a computer daily and for several hours, make sure that you assess how you are sitting at your desk. Make sure you position yourself to avoid slouching and sitting off balanced. Take short breaks as often as possible and move around.

Also, do not lean your head forward. Keep your head in a position where your ears do not pass your shoulders. When you slouch your head too far forward, you put strain on your neck and jaw muscles.

If you find that your headaches or migraines continue, and your are unable to discontinue your computer use, you may need to seek out other methods of head pain treatment. For most people however, being aware of, and making changes in posture, are enough to reduce headaches caused by computer use.

What Types of Conditions Cause TMJD?

What Types of Conditions Cause TMJD?

The temporomandibular joint is the joint that connects your jawbone to the rest of your skull. A common disorder known as TMJD (temporomandibular disorder) occurs when the muscles and surrounding tissue become painful, often resulting in a range of symptoms including headaches. TMJD is thought to be caused by any of the following conditions:

  • Grinding or Clenching teeth during sleep
  • Physical Injury
  • Arthritis

Grinding or clenching of teeth during sleep can sometimes lead to TMJD, although not always. While there are many factors that can contribute to teeth grinding and clenching, this act can put extra strain on the TMJ, resulting in pain.

Another cause of TMJD is physical injury. This occurs when the joint itself is damaged by physical force such as a blow or impact. It may also be caused by medical procedures such as breathing tubes being inserted, or some dental or orthodontic procedures requiring the jaw to be forced open for a longer time period.

Arthritis is also a risk factor for developing TMJD. The cartilage disks within the joint may become damaged due to various types of arthritis, such as rheumatoid or osteoarthritis. This corrosion of the cartilage can result in the jaw movement no longer being smooth, leading to pain and other symptoms.

Because TMJD can result in chronic headaches and other pain issues, it is important to get treatment if your symptoms do not go away on their own. Common treatments include pain relievers, anti-inflammatory medications, and muscle relaxants. In more severe cases, corticosteroid injections or even Arthroscopic surgery may be required to fix the problem.

If you are struggling and looking for TMJ headache relief, now might be the time to make an appointment with your TMJ specialist in Vancouver to get the relief you need.

Bruxism Headache Treatment

Bruxism Headache Treatment

What is Bruxism?

Bruxism is the technical term for tooth grinding and clenching. Bruxism can lead to several health problems such as:

  • Tooth wear
  • Broken teeth
  • Sore jaw and loss of jaw movement
  • Chronic headaches

The causes of Bruxism are not fully understood, but symptoms tend to worsen when under stress. Many dentists will provide soft mouthguards to reduced the damage to teeth, however this may not help with chronic headaches. In addition, if left untreated, chronic headaches can lead to debilitating migraines. It is therefore important to find headache relief.

How to find headache relief?

First and foremost, look at trying to address possible reasons you may be clenching your jaw. Look at bad habits and stressors in your life and try to address these. Find other ways to reduce stress such as regular exercise, and prioritizing tasks. Another remedy is to clear your mind using various meditation techniques. Practicing daily meditation for 10-15 minutes a day before sleeping helps to clear your mind and reduce stress. This may lead to a more relaxed jaw during sleep.

It is also important to work on developing better posture. Poor posture can translate into chronic nerve pain, also resulting in chronic headaches. Also make sure to drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. Avoid caffeinated beverages and alcohol before sleeping, as these may also increase the prevalence of bruxism while sleeping. Following these steps maybe not only reduce the headaches associated with bruxism, but also increase your overall health.